September262014
2PM
1PM

(Source: stampaday, via bookpatrol)

September252014

For #Throwback Thursday, some fun Vogue picture records from our collection.

From the Association of Vogue Picture Record Collectors: http://www.voguepicturerecords.org/records.html

Vogue picture records are phonograph records on the “Vogue” label which have a picture (an artist’s illustration) embedded in the transparent vinyl of the record. The illustrations on each side of the record are usually related to the title of the song on that side. Many of the illustrations are mushy romantic themes (see the discography). The most common Vogue picture records are 10-inch, 78 RPM records, although a few 12-inch, 78 RPM Vogue picture records were also produced.

Vogue picture records were produced by Sav-Way Industries of Detroit, Michigan. The first 10-inch Vogue picture record (catalog number R707) was released to the public in May 1946. Production ceased less than a year later in April 1947, with Sav-Way entering into receivership in August 1947. During this time, approximately seventy-four different 10-inch Vogue picture records were released.

We’ll try to post some of the “mushy romantic themes” later.

11AM

by ctophermac:
1/5
I’m thrilled to share a series of posters I illustrated for Strand Book Store in New York celebrating Banned Books Week (Sept. 22nd-28th)! I’ll be posting one of these illustrations every day this week just to remind you that banned books are the best books.
Thanks to art director Lisa Jee!

by ctophermac:

1/5

I’m thrilled to share a series of posters I illustrated for Strand Book Store in New York celebrating Banned Books Week (Sept. 22nd-28th)! I’ll be posting one of these illustrations every day this week just to remind you that banned books are the best books.

Thanks to art director Lisa Jee!

(via bookporn)

10AM
detroithistoricalsociety:

Celebrate National Comic Book Day by doing the mouse with Soupy Sales, Archie, Betty, Veronica, Pookie, and White Fang in this special issue from 1965.  Milton “Soupy Sales” Supman started out on Detroit’s WXYZ in 1953.  His show was picked up for national broadcast by ABC in 1959.  Judging from this comic, this wider exposure brought him a following in Archie’s Riverdale.  Several stories are contained within, including one where Archie interrupts Veronica’s father, Mr. Lodge, while he is trying to watch The Soupy Sales Show.  Luckily, the issue doesn’t include a meeting between “the meanest dog in Detroit” White Fang, and Jughead’s beloved Hot Dog.

detroithistoricalsociety:

Celebrate National Comic Book Day by doing the mouse with Soupy Sales, Archie, Betty, Veronica, Pookie, and White Fang in this special issue from 1965.  Milton “Soupy Sales” Supman started out on Detroit’s WXYZ in 1953.  His show was picked up for national broadcast by ABC in 1959.  Judging from this comic, this wider exposure brought him a following in Archie’s Riverdale.  Several stories are contained within, including one where Archie interrupts Veronica’s father, Mr. Lodge, while he is trying to watch The Soupy Sales Show.  Luckily, the issue doesn’t include a meeting between “the meanest dog in Detroit” White Fang, and Jughead’s beloved Hot Dog.

September242014

by ctophermac:
3/5
The next in my series of posters celebrating Banned Books Week for Strand Book Store, inspired by soviet propaganda lithographs.

by ctophermac:

3/5

The next in my series of posters celebrating Banned Books Week for Strand Book Store, inspired by soviet propaganda lithographs.

(via bookporn)

8PM

by ctophermac:
2/5
The second of my five posters for Strand Book Store celebrating Banned Books Week! This piece was inspired by the powerful street posters from the Paris 1968 uprising.

by ctophermac:

2/5

The second of my five posters for Strand Book Store celebrating Banned Books Week! This piece was inspired by the powerful street posters from the Paris 1968 uprising.

(via bookporn)

4PM

thegetty:

Banned Books Week—History Edition

Giordano Bruno revealed ancient secrets of improving memory by writing about the method of loci, also known as the memory palace.

This technique is still used today as a way to memorize vast amounts of information. By “putting away” information into the drawers and rooms of a familiar place in your mind, you can access this info later by mentally “opening” the right drawer. 

Unfortunately, this idea was not accepted during the Roman Inquisition. Bruno was burned at the stake in 1600 and his book was on the Vatican Index of Prohibited Books.

Enjoy a completely digitized copy: De umbris idearum, 1582, Bruno Giordano. The Getty Research Institute

Banned Books Week celebrates the freedom to read. This week we’re sharing examples of books from cultural history that have been attacked, vilified, or otherwise banned.

4PM

Banned Book Week

othmeralia:

The first official list of banned books was the Index Librorum Prohibitorum of the Catholic Church. An impressive list of authors in the Neville Collection have appeared upon the Index. They include Diderot, Freind, Glanville, Locke, Swedenborg, and many others. 

The enquiries of the Royal Society claimed that even if some persons had direct experience of witchcraft (a thing not doubted by Glanvill and many others alive at the time), logic could overrule empirical observation to place the observation in doubt. By the same token, Glanvill argued skillfully, Hobbes would have to be right and Boyle wrong. Glanvill’s type of argument is still used to render other arguments about spiritual or indeed humanistic matters inconclusive within science, and may be seen in various forms in today’s interchange between religion and science. Fortunately, it does not always equal repression of the opposing side, and the Western world has abandoned belief in witches as a tool to persecute women. But the damage was done: women’s health, especially gynecological topics and birth control, remain among the most-censored topics in all of the history of science. It is thus delightful to find two editions of John Freind’s Emmenologia in qua fluxus muliebris menstrui phaenomena in the Neville collection, including the first English edition (1729). John Freind (1675-1728), was himself a censor of the Royal College of Physicians. Interestingly and ironically, Friend spent some time in the Tower when he came under suspicion of supporting the Stuart dynasty’s claim to the throne. Emmenologia is one of the first printed works dealing with menstruation as a scientific phenomenon worthy of study in the same spirit as other iatrochemical works on human blood rather than in the quasi-magical spirit that persisted long after the Renaissance in matters pertaining to women’s bodies and health. The book was met with controversy and opposition when it was published; today its basis in mechanics has been long superseded, but it remains an outstanding example of science used in the true pursuit of knowledge rather than its convenient suppression.

image

Check back to see other Banned Books from centuries past.

[From Centuries of censorship: books and their survival in the Neville Collection exhibit curated by Tanya Avakian for Banned Book Week in 2006]

Read More

4PM

bookpatrol:

Five Book Tribute to Banned Books Week

It is Banned Books Week and here are five titles that deal with the issue as a whole or are dedicated to an individual book.

Happy reading!

Banned Books: Informal Notes on Some Books Banned fort Various Reasons at Various Times for Various Reasons by Anne Lyon Haight. R.R. Bowker Company. New York, 1955. Second Edition Revised and Enlarged Buy: Buy: Used copies of the First and Second Edition

Purity in Print: The Vice Society Movement and Book Censorship in America. Charles Scribner’s Sons. New York, 1968.

Buy:

First Edition, 1968.

Second Edition with two new chapters carrying his history forward to the beginning of the twenty-first century.

The Trial of Lady Chatterley: Regina vs Penguin Books Limited. Edited by C.H. Rolph. Penguin Books. Baltimore 1961. Buy Used

Howl on Trial: The Battle for Free Expression Edited by Bill Morgan and Nancy J. Peters. San Francisco City Lights, 2006. Buy: Amazon | Publisher

Seal of Approval: The History of the Comics Codeby Amy Kiste Nyberg. University Press of Mississippi. Jackson, 1998. In 1954 the comic book industry adopted a self-regulatory code in response to public and governmental pressure. Buy.

4PM

detroithistoricalsociety:

Perhaps you’ll want to take some inspiration from 1939 for your fall wardrobe?  These photos were taken of fall window displays at the Crowley, Milner and Company Department Store in downtown Detroit, by photographer Davis B. Hillmer.  In addition to fall fashions, these displays carried a secondary theme—the 1939 New York World’s Fair.  Among the peaked hats, furs, and shoes are posters and miniatures representing the fair’s Trylon and Perisphere, Marine Transportation Building, Motor Transportation Building, and Communications Building.

4PM
4PM
vintageanchorbooks:

Celebrate Banned Books Week by reading a banned book.

vintageanchorbooks:

Celebrate Banned Books Week by reading a banned book.

(via bookporn)

4PM
ctophermac:

5/5
My last and favorite poster celebrating Banned Books Week at Strand Book Store in New York. If you happen to be in the city this weekend, stop by the store to see these illustrations on display through the end of the month! Thanks again to art director Lisa Jee!

ctophermac:

5/5

My last and favorite poster celebrating Banned Books Week at Strand Book Store in New York. If you happen to be in the city this weekend, stop by the store to see these illustrations on display through the end of the month! Thanks again to art director Lisa Jee!

(via bookpatrol)

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